1. This sketch was a gift from actress Diana Barrymore, son of John and aunt to Drew. It’s a funny mash-up reference of Hamlet and a production of Moss Hart’s Light Up the Sky that featured the actress. 
She died young, from an overdose at the age of 38. 

    This sketch was a gift from actress Diana Barrymore, son of John and aunt to Drew. It’s a funny mash-up reference of Hamlet and a production of Moss Hart’s Light Up the Sky that featured the actress. 

    She died young, from an overdose at the age of 38. 

  2. For EAG’s ‘maiden GIF’, here’s Derrick Davis of The Lion King singing at this year’s Broadway Blessing. (pics by Barbara Primosch!) 

    For EAG’s ‘maiden GIF’, here’s Derrick Davis of The Lion King singing at this year’s Broadway Blessing. (pics by Barbara Primosch!) 

  3. Today, Sunday matinees on Broadway are part of the job. But as this op-ed shows, the effort to close theatres on the Sabbath was at one time pretty strong. 

    According to The Ram’s Horn, Sabbath shows created “a low state of morality, both on and off the stage,” and were a threat to Christians whether they bought a ticket or not. 

    The most aggressive idea offered - “legislation” and criminal charges - was from the Actors’ Society of America, a union whose dissolution helped make way for the founding of Actors Equity in 1913. 

  4. Call it the Tiger Beat of Victorian England. Pearson’s Footlight Favourites, printed in four editions, each packed w/ staged pics of notable actors in costume.

    The most interesting are those of Fred Storey and Harry Grattan (above), dressed for a production called The Vigilance Committee

    It seems a good bet that this play had some connection to the The Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, created a few yrs prior to track down Jack the Ripper. 

  5. After a late-summer break, we’re back today w/ a 1904 program from a performance of The Merchant of Venice at the Harlem Opera House. Located at 207 W. 125th St., the theatre opened in 1889, and met the wrecking ball in 1959. 

    Today, the plot is occupied by a FedEx Print & Ship, but underground, Harlem Opera House lives on as part of the mosaic art of the 125th St. station. 

    The Bowery Boys blog has a nice history of the theatre. 

  6. fieglet said: Hi, I have inquired before about my relative, Jessie Van Brunt, who is a deceased member of the George Holland Society. I am looking at the old photo you posted of the group of people enjoying a tea party or something like that. Are there names on the back of the photo? I am thinking Jessie Van Brunt is directly beneath the man holding the teacup and saucer in the back row. Her face is away from the camera. I would love to know if you have any other possible photos of Jessie in the archives!

    some pics do have names, but sadly not this one. if i come across more pictures with names, i’ll keep an eye out for hers. Cheers! 

  7. We’ve lost a true titan of stage and screen with the passing of Richard Attenborough (1923-2014).

    Kids of my generation know him best as the dangerously determined dreamer John Hammond from Jurassic Park. It’s worth noting though that the good Lord Attenborough had an Oscar and book-length resume long before T-Rex called him in for a read-through.

    Above, EAG member Ken Starrett (US Director, Noel Coward Society) was kind to share this pic of he and Richard together in 2006 at London’s Noel Coward Theatre.