1. Since 1923, our office and theatre space has been located on the second floor of New York’s landmark Little Church Around the Corner. A few times a month, we host events in the space, with all the $$ going to help local actors in need.

    All EAG events are open to the public, and no…an old hat is not required. 

    See all the good stuff at actorsguild.org

  2. I had never heard of Petulia before finding this large, vibrant poster deep in the stacks. It was shot in San Francisco in 1968, and features cameos by Janis Joplin and The Grateful Dead (w/ Pig Pen). 

    Our connection here is with George C. Scott, whose son, actor Campbell Scott, is a member of our Advisory Board. Scott also established a scholarship in honor of his father, which is given annually to a theatre student at the University of Missouri.  

  3. For five years, this theatre ad has been on our wall. Today, I finally took a closer look. Here’s what I found…
First off, it’s really old. Like day after Christmas 1785 old! Of all we own, I can’t think of a piece that goes back further. 
Also of note: Zara is a 5-act tragedy, written in 1732 by Voltaire. The play found big audiences in France, and later England.
The second play, Hurly-Burly or the Fairy of the Well, was written by English librettist James Cobb, whose artistic career began while employed with the East Indian Trading Company. 
Read Zara here.
Read Hurly Burly or the Fairy of the Well here.

    For five years, this theatre ad has been on our wall. Today, I finally took a closer look. Here’s what I found…

    First off, it’s really old. Like day after Christmas 1785 old! Of all we own, I can’t think of a piece that goes back further. 

    Also of note: Zara is a 5-act tragedy, written in 1732 by Voltaire. The play found big audiences in France, and later England.

    The second play, Hurly-Burly or the Fairy of the Well, was written by English librettist James Cobb, whose artistic career began while employed with the East Indian Trading Company. 

    Read Zara here.

    Read Hurly Burly or the Fairy of the Well here.

  4. — postcard, Stage Door Canteen, Washington, D.C. 
Today, the American Theatre Wing is best known as the folks behind the Tony Awards. But in WWII, the Wing ran a chain of “canteens,” where servicemen could find top entertainment, stars of stage and screen, and a rare moment to relax.
Most amazing is that these theatres were open to all Allied soldiers, regardless of race or nationality. 
If you want more on the Stage Door Canteens, Cathy Urwin’s article is a fine place to start. 

    — postcard, Stage Door Canteen, Washington, D.C. 

    Today, the American Theatre Wing is best known as the folks behind the Tony Awards. But in WWII, the Wing ran a chain of “canteens,” where servicemen could find top entertainment, stars of stage and screen, and a rare moment to relax.

    Most amazing is that these theatres were open to all Allied soldiers, regardless of race or nationality. 

    If you want more on the Stage Door Canteens, Cathy Urwin’s article is a fine place to start. 

  5. In 1893, The Players (founded by Edwin Booth) gathered a few marquee names to celebrate the 60th birthday of the famed actor. Absent, of course, was Booth, who died a few months prior. 

    Included in the program were addresses by actors Joseph Jefferson, the Henry’s Miller and Irving, and Italian star Tommaso Salvini, who Stanislavski later cited as a major influence. 

    To this day, the Players celebrate the birthday of Booth with an annual party in their space on Gramercy Park. 

  6. "Riff raff, street rat…our archives has that." 

    Long before Disney and Broadway, Mother Goose saw gold in the story of a poor boy and his lamp. These pics are from a beautifully illustrated collection of stories and rhymes, published in the 1880s. 

    Side note…go crazy folks! EAG is officially in the GIF game! 

  7. Above is the original Stage Manager’s script from the 1955 Broadway production of Inherit the Wind

    The iconic courtroom drama ran for 806 shows at the National Theatre (now Nederlander) before closing in June of 1957.

    The fictional play is based on the unfortunate and very real story of a Tennessee high-school teacher who, in 1925, was put on trial for teaching Darwin’s theory of evolution. 

    An equally dramatic and “winded” trailer for the 1960 film adaptation can be seen here.

  8. In 1948, the Episcopal Church worked with our organization to create a radio show called “Great Scenes from Great Plays.”

    22 half hour programs were recorded, many of which featured the voices of major stars like Henry Fonda, Jessica Tandy, Gene Tierney, and Ingrid Bergman. 

    Most wonderful for theatre nerds today is that many of these programs can be heard online HERE

    More postings soon on this great bit of history, but for now…Happy Listening!