1. Call it the Tiger Beat of Victorian England. Pearson’s Footlight Favourites, printed in four editions, each packed w/ staged pics of notable actors in costume.

    The most interesting are those of Fred Storey and Harry Grattan (above), dressed for a production called The Vigilance Committee

    It seems a good bet that this play had some connection to the The Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, created a few yrs prior to track down Jack the Ripper. 

  2. After a late-summer break, we’re back today w/ a 1904 program from a performance of The Merchant of Venice at the Harlem Opera House. Located at 207 W. 125th St., the theatre opened in 1889, and met the wrecking ball in 1959. 

    Today, the plot is occupied by a FedEx Print & Ship, but underground, Harlem Opera House lives on as part of the mosaic art of the 125th St. station. 

    The Bowery Boys blog has a nice history of the theatre. 

  3. fieglet said: Hi, I have inquired before about my relative, Jessie Van Brunt, who is a deceased member of the George Holland Society. I am looking at the old photo you posted of the group of people enjoying a tea party or something like that. Are there names on the back of the photo? I am thinking Jessie Van Brunt is directly beneath the man holding the teacup and saucer in the back row. Her face is away from the camera. I would love to know if you have any other possible photos of Jessie in the archives!

    some pics do have names, but sadly not this one. if i come across more pictures with names, i’ll keep an eye out for hers. Cheers! 

  4. We’ve lost a true titan of stage and screen with the passing of Richard Attenborough (1923-2014).

    Kids of my generation know him best as the dangerously determined dreamer John Hammond from Jurassic Park. It’s worth noting though that the good Lord Attenborough had an Oscar and book-length resume long before T-Rex called him in for a read-through.

    Above, EAG member Ken Starrett (US Director, Noel Coward Society) was kind to share this pic of he and Richard together in 2006 at London’s Noel Coward Theatre.

  5. Since 1923, our office and theatre space has been located on the second floor of New York’s landmark Little Church Around the Corner. A few times a month, we host events in the space, with all the $$ going to help local actors in need.

    All EAG events are open to the public, and no…an old hat is not required. 

    See all the good stuff at actorsguild.org

  6. I had never heard of Petulia before finding this large, vibrant poster deep in the stacks. It was shot in San Francisco in 1968, and features cameos by Janis Joplin and The Grateful Dead (w/ Pig Pen). 

    Our connection here is with George C. Scott, whose son, actor Campbell Scott, is a member of our Advisory Board. Scott also established a scholarship in honor of his father, which is given annually to a theatre student at the University of Missouri.  

  7. For five years, this theatre ad has been on our wall. Today, I finally took a closer look. Here’s what I found…
First off, it’s really old. Like day after Christmas 1785 old! Of all we own, I can’t think of a piece that goes back further. 
Also of note: Zara is a 5-act tragedy, written in 1732 by Voltaire. The play found big audiences in France, and later England.
The second play, Hurly-Burly or the Fairy of the Well, was written by English librettist James Cobb, whose artistic career began while employed with the East Indian Trading Company. 
Read Zara here.
Read Hurly Burly or the Fairy of the Well here.

    For five years, this theatre ad has been on our wall. Today, I finally took a closer look. Here’s what I found…

    First off, it’s really old. Like day after Christmas 1785 old! Of all we own, I can’t think of a piece that goes back further. 

    Also of note: Zara is a 5-act tragedy, written in 1732 by Voltaire. The play found big audiences in France, and later England.

    The second play, Hurly-Burly or the Fairy of the Well, was written by English librettist James Cobb, whose artistic career began while employed with the East Indian Trading Company. 

    Read Zara here.

    Read Hurly Burly or the Fairy of the Well here.

  8. — postcard, Stage Door Canteen, Washington, D.C. 
Today, the American Theatre Wing is best known as the folks behind the Tony Awards. But in WWII, the Wing ran a chain of “canteens,” where servicemen could find top entertainment, stars of stage and screen, and a rare moment to relax.
Most amazing is that these theatres were open to all Allied soldiers, regardless of race or nationality. 
If you want more on the Stage Door Canteens, Cathy Urwin’s article is a fine place to start. 

    — postcard, Stage Door Canteen, Washington, D.C. 

    Today, the American Theatre Wing is best known as the folks behind the Tony Awards. But in WWII, the Wing ran a chain of “canteens,” where servicemen could find top entertainment, stars of stage and screen, and a rare moment to relax.

    Most amazing is that these theatres were open to all Allied soldiers, regardless of race or nationality. 

    If you want more on the Stage Door Canteens, Cathy Urwin’s article is a fine place to start.